Author: John Chodacki

PIDapalooza is back!

PIDlove Logo

Guess what!?!?  PIDapalooza is back!  This time we will meet up with the nerdiest PID folks on January 23-24, for a two-day celebration of persistent identifiers and networked research. 

Brought to you by California Digital Library, Crossref, DataCite, and ORCID.  Together, we will do the impossible – make a meeting about persistent identifiers and networked research fun! 

Perfect PID-sessions

This year’s sessions are organized around eight broad topics:

PIDapalooza logo

  • PID myths
  • Achieving persistence
  • PIDs for emerging uses
  • Legacy PIDs
  • Bridging worlds
  • PIDagogy
  • PID stories
  • Kinds of persistence

The program is final and there’s something for everyone! From Do Researchers Need to Care about PID Systems? to Stories from the PID Roadies: Scholix; From The Bollockschain and other PID Hallucinations to #ResInfoCitizenshipIs?

There will also be plenaries by Johanna McEntyre on As a [biologist] I want to [reuse and remix data] so that I can [do my research] and Melissa Haendel (title to be confirmed).

Get your tix!

Now’s the time to register – we hope to see you there!

 

Skills Training for Librarians: Expanding Library Carpentry

In today’s data-driven, online and highly interconnected world, librarians are key to supporting diverse information needs and leading best practices to work with and manage data. For librarians to be effective in a rapidly evolving information landscape, training and professional development opportunities in both computational and data skills must be available and accessible.

OIMLS logover the past couple years, an international Library Carpentry (LC) movement has begun that seeks to emulate the success of the Carpentries — both the Data Carpentry and Software Carpentry initiatives — in providing librarians with the critical computational and data skills they need to serve their stakeholders and user communities, as well as streamline repetitive workflows and use best data practices within the library. This Library Carpentry community has already developed initial curriculum and taught more than 40 workshops around the world.

We are excited to announce that California Digital Library (CDL) has been awarded project grant funds from IMLS to further advance the scope, adoption, and impact of Library Carpentry across the US.  CDL’s 2-year project will be conducted by their digital curation team, University of California Curation Center (UC3), and will focus on these main activities: 

  1. development and updates of core training modules optimized for the librarian community and based on Carpentries pedagogy
  2. regionally-organized training opportunities for librarians, leading to an expanding cohort of certified instructors available to train fellow librarians in critical skills and tools, such as the command line, OpenRefine, Python, R, SQL, and research data management
  3. community outreach to raise awareness of Library Carpentry and promote the development of a broad, engaged community of support to sustain the movement and to advance LC integration within the newly forming Carpentries organization

Why Library Carpentry?

Library Carpentry leverages the success of the Carpentries pedagogy, which is based on providing a goal-oriented, hands-on, trial-and-error approach to learning computational skills, and extends it to meet the specific needs of librarians.

It is often difficult to figure out what skills to learn or how to get started learning them. In Library Carpentry, we identify the fundamental skills needed for librarians and develop and teach these skills in hands-on, interactive workshops. Workshops are designed for people with little to no prior computational experience, and they work with data relevant to librarians (so that librarians are working with data most applicable to their own work). WAnd workshops are also friendly learning environments with the sole aim of empowering people to use computational skills effectively and with more confidence.

How does this relate to the Carpentries?

Two sister organizations, Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry, have focused on teaching computational best practices. The ‘separate but collaborative’ organizational structure allowed both groups to build a shared community of instructors with more than 1000 certified instructors and 47 current Member Organizations around the world.  However, as Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry grew and developed, this ‘separate but collaborative’ organizational structure did not scale. As a result, the governing committees of both Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry recognized that as more mature organizations they can be most effective under a unified governance model.

On August 30, 2017, the Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry Steering Committees met jointly and approved the following two motions, which together form a strong commitment to continue moving forward with a merger.  As part of this merger, the new “Carpentries” organization will look to increase its reach into additional sectors and communities.  The nascent Library Carpentry community has recently met to decide they aim to join as a full-fledged ‘Carpentry’ in the coming year.

This grant will help LC solidify approaches to learning and community building, while also bringing resources to the table as we embark on future integration of LC within the merged Carpentries organization.

How does the Carpentries model work?

In the Carpentries model, instructors are trained and certified in the Carpentries way of teaching, using educational pedagogy, and are asked to commit to offering workshops in their regions and reworking/improving and maintaining lessons. These instructors teach two-day, hands-on workshops on the foundational skills to manage and work effectively with data. The goal is to become practitioners while in the workshop and then continue learning through online and in-person community interaction outside the classroom.

With the “train-the-trainer” model, the Carpentries are built to create learning networks and capacity for training through active communities and shared, collaborative lessons. They have used this model to scale with parallel approaches of developing lessons, offering workshops, and expanding the community. The LC community has also used this model and our grant project aims to extend this further.

Next Steps

As an immediate next step, CDL has begun recruiting for a Library Carpentry Project Coordinator.  This will be a 2-year and grant funded position.  You can apply at the UC Office of the President website.  Due date is November 30, 2017.   

While this position will report to CDL’s Director of University of California Curation Center (UC3), this position will focus on extending LC activities in the USA and working globally to gain capacity and reach for the Library Carpentry community and Carpentries staff.

For more information on this project, please feel free to contact CDL’s UC3 team at uc3@ucop.edu You can also follow UC3 on Twitter at @UC3CDL.  To learn more about Library Carpentry, you can visit https://librarycarpentry.github.io and follow on Twitter at @LibCarpentry.

We look forward to these next steps for Library Carpentry and a growing network of data savvy librarians.

RFI for organizational identifier registry

Organizations/institutions are a key part of the scholarly communications ecosystem. However, we lack an openly licensed, independently run organizational identifier standard to use for common affiliation and citation use cases.

To define a solution to this problem, a group of interested parties drafted and shared a proposal at last year’s PIDapalooza.  Based on that discussion, earlier this year Crossref, DataCite and ORCID announced the formation of an Organization Identifier Working Group and UC3 has supported this effort by our Director, John Chodacki, serving as chair of the Working Group.

Image Credit: ORCID

Scope of Work

The primary goal of our working group (loosely codenamed OrgID or Open PIIR – Open Persistent Institutional​ Identifier Registry) is to build a plan for how to best fill this gap and our main uses were to facilitate the disambiguation of researcher affiliations.

The working group used a series of breakout groups to refine the structure, principles, and technology specifications for an open, independent, non-profit organization identifier registry. We worked in three interdependent areas: Governance, Product Definition, and Business Model, and recently released for public comment our findings and recommendations for governance and product requirements.

Summary of findings & recommendations

After 9 months, the recommendations are the creation of an open, independent organization/institution identifier registry:

  • with capabilities for organizations/institutions to manage their own record,
  • seeded with and using open data,
  • overseen by an independent governance structure, and
  • incubated within a non-profit host organization/institution (providing technical development, operations and other support) during its initial start-up phase.

Request for Information

Our working group has now issued a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit comment and to hear from groups interested in hosting and/or developing this registry.

  • Are you interested in serving as a the start-up host organziation?
  • Do you have organization data you are willing to contribute?
  • Do you have other resources that could be helpful for the project?
  • Do you have advice, suggestions, and feedback on creating a sustainable business model for each phase of the Registry’s development?

We’d like to hear from you!  Please help spread the word!

Before drafting responses, please also see our original A Way Forward document for additional framing principles. Also, please note that all responses will be reviewed by a subgroup of the Organization Identifier Working Group (that will exclude any RFI respondents).

 

Update: revised November 1, 2017

As posted above, the working group issued a Request for Information (RFI) on 9 October 2017 to solicit comment and interest from the broader research community in developing the Registry. We have received a number of questions about the RFI. The purpose of this post is to clarify the RFI, the process for reviewing responses, and the next steps for developing the registry. Please use this template to respond to the RFI.

(1) When are the responses due?

We have extended the deadline for responses to 1 December 2017.

(2) Who should be responding?

Any organization interested in (i) providing open data, (ii) participating in a governance role, (iii) serving as technical and/or administrative host for the Registry organization , and / or (iv) providing technology, staffing, or marketing resources.

(3) How much detail should the response include?

A general description of your interest (see (2) above), and a short description of the resources you could bring to the Registry will suffice. We are not requesting a detailed cost proposal. While framing your responses, please see the Governance and Product documents for requirements and principles. Please use this template to respond to the RFI.

(4) How will the responses be reviewed?

Responses will be received by the Organization Identifier Steering Group.  In early December, they will develop a summary and list of respondents to share with the full Working Group and the Executive Committees of Crossref, DataCite, and ORCID boards for review. We propose a meeting of stakeholders in late January, potentially the day before the PIDapalooza meeting, to discuss options with the respondents for a collaborative approach to developing the Registry. From there, next steps will be proposed.

(6) Who do I contact if I have more questions?

Please email the Org ID steering group with any questions.  Or, if you have any other questions/comments about the involvement of CDL’s UC3 team, let us know at uc3@ucop.edu

NSF EAGER Grant for Actionable DMPs

We’re delighted to announce that the California Digital Library has been awarded a 2-year NSF EAGER grant to support active, machine-actionable data management plans (DMPs). The vision is to convert DMPs from a compliance exercise based on static text documents into a key component of a networked research data management ecosystem that not only facilitates, but improves the research process for all stakeholders.

Machine-actionable “refers to information that is structured in a consistent way so that machines, or computers, can be programmed against the structure” (DDI definition). Through prototyping and pilot projects we will experiment with making DMPs machine-actionable.

Imagine if the information contained in a DMP could flow across other systems automatically (e.g., to populate faculty profiles, monitor grants, notify repositories of data in the pipeline) and reduce administrative burdens. What if DMPs were part of active research workflows, and served to connect researchers with tailored guidance and resources at appropriate points over the course of a project? The grant will enable us to extend ongoing work with researchers, institutions, data repositories, funders, and international organizations (e.g., Research Data Alliance, Force11) to define a vision of machine-actionable DMPs and explore this enhanced DMP future. Working with a broad coalition of stakeholders, we will implement, test, and refine machine-actionable DMP use cases. The work plan also involves outreach to domain-specific research communities (environmental science, biomedical science) and pilot projects with various partners (full proposal text).

Active DMP community

Building on our existing partnership with the Digital Curation Centre, we look forward to incorporating new collaborators and aligning our work with wider community efforts to create a future world of machine-actionable DMPs. We’re aware that many of you are already experimenting in this arena and are energized to connect the dots, share experiences, and help carry things forward. These next-generation DMPs are a key component in the globally networked research data management ecosystem. We also plan to provide a neutral forum (not tied to any particular tool or project or working group) to ground conversations and community efforts.

Follow the conversation @ActiveDMPs #ActiveDMPs and activedmps.org (forthcoming). You can also join the active, machine-actionable DMP community (live or remote participation) at the RDA plenary in Montreal and Force11 meeting in Berlin to contribute to next steps.

Contact us to get involved!

cross-posted from https://blog.dmptool.org/2017/09/18/nsf-eager-grant-for-making-dmps-actionable/

PIDapalooza is back!

PIDapalooza is back, by popular demand!  We’re building on the the best of the inaugural PIDapalooza and organizing two days packed with discussions, demos, informal and interactive sessions, updates, talks by leading PID innovators, and more. There will be lots of opportunities to network – and to learn from and engage with PID enthusiasts from around the world.All in a fun, relaxed, and welcoming atmosphere!

We’re looking for your PIDeas! Want to update the community on your current PID projects? Brainstorm new ones? Bring together experts with different perspectives on PID-related topics? Find out what’s new in PID-land? Share your experiences of creating, innovating, or communicating about PIDs? We welcome your proposals for energetic,exciting, and thoughtful rapid-fire sessions related to our eight festival themes :

  1. PID myths.  Are PIDs a dream or reality?  PID stands for Persistent IDentifier, but what does that mean and does such a thing exist?
  2. Achieving persistence.  So many factors affect persistence: resolvability, mission, oversight, funding, succession, redundancy, governance.  Is open infrastructure for scholarly communication the key to achieving persistence?
  3. PIDs for emerging uses.  Long-term identifiers are no longer just for digital objects.  PIDs are used for people, organizations, resources, vocabulary terms, and more. What are you identifying?
  4. Legacy PIDs.  There are of thousands of venerable identifier systems that people want to bring into the modern research information ecosystem.  How can we manage this effectively?
  5. Bridging worlds.  What would optimize the interoperation of  PID systemsy?  Would standardized metadata and APIs across PID types solve many of the problems, and if so, how would that be achieved?  What about standardized link/relation types?
  6. PIDagogy.  It’s a challenge for those who provide PID services and tools to engage the wider community. How do you teach, learn, persuade, discuss, and improve adoption? What’s it mean to build a pedagogy for PIDs?
  7. PID stories.  Which strategies work?  Which strategies fail?  Tell us your horror stories! Share your victories!
  8. Kinds of persistence.  What are the frontiers of ‘persistence’? We hear lots about rigor and reproducibility, but what about data papers promoting PIDs for long-term access to objects that change over time, like software or live data feeds?

Please use this short form to tell us about your proposed session. The program committee will review all suggestions received by and we’ll let you know whether you’ve been successful by the first week of October.

We’ll be posting more information about the festival lineup on the PIDapalooza website and on Twitter (@PIDapalooza) in the coming weeks. We hope to see you in January!

PIDapalooza – the details

Where: Auditori Palau de Congressos de Girona, Passeig de la Devesa, 35, Girona, Catalonia, Spain
When: 23rd and 24th January 2018
Deadline for proposals: September 18 – please use this short form to submit session(s)

New Exhibit: Literatura de Cordel

Literatura de Cordel exhibit case

This exhibition highlights a collection of Brazilian chapbooks or Literatura de Cordel in the Moffitt Library. These chapbooks are still produced for mass consumption in the Northeastern Brazil. These are called literature de cordel as they are hung from a cord in the book-stands so that the consumers can browse them and select them according to their desires. There are several themes that are portrayed in these chap-books. A story is narrated within the cordel in a poetic form and themes can vary from religious, political, social and romantic. The curatorial team that consists of Dr. Liladhar Pendse, Aisha Hamilton and Kevin Cloud invites to visit the physical exhibit in the Moffitt Library through June 30, 2017. However for those who cannot come to the campus, we have prepared an online counterpart of this physical exhibition.

 

Source: New Exhibit: Literatura de Cordel

Ensuring access to critical research data

For the last two months, UC3 have been working with the teams at Data.gov, Data Refuge, Internet Archive, and Code For Science (creators of the Dat Project) to aggregate the government data.

Data that spans the globe

There are currently volunteers across the country working to discover and preserve publicly funded research, especially climate data, from being deleted or lost from the public record. The largest initiative is called Data Refuge and is led by librarians and scientists. They are holding events across the UC campuses and the US that you should attend and help out in person, and are organizing the library community to band together to curate the data and ensure it’s preserved and accessible.

Our initiative builds on this and is looking to build a corpus of government data and corresponding metadata.  We are focusing on public research data, especially those at risk of disappearing. The initiative was nicknamed “Svalbard” by Max Ogden of the Dat project, after the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the Arctic.  As of today, our friends at Code for Science have released 38GB of metadata, over 30 million hashes and URLs of research data files.

The Svalbard Global Seed Vault in the Arctic

To aid in this effort

We have assembled the following metadata as part of the Code for Science’s Svalbard v1:

  • 2.7 million SHA-256 hashes for all downloadable resources linked from Data.gov, representing around 40TB of data
  • 29 million SHA-1 hashes of files archived by the Internet Archive and the Archive Team from federal websites and FTP servers, representing over 120TB of data
  • All metadata from Data.gov, about 2.1 million datasets
  • A list of ~750 .gov and .mil FTP servers

There are additional sources such as Archivers.Space, EDGI, Climate Mirror, Azimuth Data Backup that we are working adding metadata for in future releases.

Following the principles set forth by the librarians behind Data Refuge, we believe it’s important to establish a clear and trustworthy chain of custody for research datasets so that mirror copies can be trusted. With this project, we are working to curate metadata that includes strong cryptographic hashes of data files in addition to metadata that can be used to reproduce a download procedure from the originating host.

We are hoping the community can use this data in the following ways:

  • To independently verify that the mirroring processes that produced these hashes can be reproduced
  • To aid in developing new forms of redundant dataset distribution (such as peer to peer networks)
  • To seed additional web crawls or scraping efforts with additional dataset source URLs
  • To encourage other archiving efforts to publish their metadata in an easily accessible format
  • To cross reference data across archives, for deduplication or verification purposes

What about the data?

The metadata is great, but the initial release of 30 million hashes and urls is just part of our project. The actual content (how the hashes were derived) have also been downloaded.  They are stored at either the Internet Archive or on our California Digital Library servers.

The Dat Project carried out a Data.gov HTTP mirror (~40TB) and uploaded it to our servers at California Digital Library. We are working with them to access ~160TB of data in the future and have partnered with UC Riverside to offer longer term storage .

Download

You can download the metadata here using Dat Desktop or Dat CLI tool.  We are using the Dat Protocol for distribution so that we can publish new metadata releases efficiently while still keeping the old versions around. Dat provides a secure cryptographic ledger, similar in concept to a blockchain, that can verify integrity of updates.

Feedback

If you want to learn more about how CDL and the UC3 team is involved, contact us at uc3@ucop.edu or @UC3CDL. If you have suggestions or questions, you can join the Code for Science Community Chat.  And, if you are a technical user you can report issues or get involved at the Svalbard GitHub.

This is crossposted here: https://medium.com/@maxogden/project-svalbard-a-metadata-vault-for-research-data-7088239177ab#.f933mmts8

Government Data At Risk

Government data is at risk, but that is nothing new.

The existence of Data.gov, the Federal Open Data Policy, and open government data belies the fact that, historically, a vast amount of government data and digital information is at risk of disappearing in the transition between presidential administrations. For example, between 2008 and 2012, over 80 percent of the PDFs hosted on .gov domains disappeared. To track these and other changes, California Digital Library (CDL) joined with the University of North Texas, The Library of Congress, the Internet Archive, and the U.S. Government Publishing office to create the End of Term (EOT) Archive. After archiving the web presence of federal agencies in 2008 and 2012, the team initiated a new crawl in September of 2016.

In light of recent events, tools and infrastructure initially developed for EOT and other projects have been taken up by efforts to backup “at risk” datasets, including those related to the environment, climate change, and social justice. Data Refuge, coordinated by the Penn Program of Environmental Humanities (PPEH), has organized a series of “Data Rescue” events across the country where volunteers nominate webpages for submission to the End of Term Archive and harvest “uncrawlable” data to be bagged and submitted to an open data archive. Efforts such as the Azimuth Climate Data Backup Project and Climate Mirror do not involve submitting data or information directly to the End of Term Archive, but have similar aims and workflows.

These efforts are great for raising awareness and building back-ups of key collections. In the background, CDL and the team behind the Dat Project have worked to backup Data.gov, itself. The goal is not only to preserve the datasets catalogued by Data.gov but also the associated metadata and organization that makes it such a useful location for finding and using government data. As a result of this partnership, for the first time ever, the entire Data.gov metadata catalog of over 2 million datasets will soon be available for bulk download. This will allow the various backup efforts to coordinate and cross reference their data sets with those on Data.gov. To allow for further coordination and cross referencing, the Dat team has also begun acquiring the metadata for all the files acquired by Data Refuge, the Azimuth Climate Data Project, and Climate Mirror.

In an effort to keep track of all these efforts to preserve government data and information, we’re maintaining the following annotated list. As new efforts emerge or existing efforts broaden or change their focus, we’ll make sure the list is updated. Feel free to send additional info on government data projects to: uc3@ucop.edu

Get involved: Ongoing Efforts to Preserve Scientific Data or Support Science

Data.gov – The home of the U.S. Government’s open data, much of which is non-biological and non-environmental. Data.gov has a lightweight system for reporting and tracking datasets that aren’t represented and functions as a single point of discovery for federal data. Newly archived data can and should be reported there. CDL and the Dat team are currently working to backup the data catalogued on Data.gov and also the associated metadata.

End of Term – A collaborative project to capture and save U.S. Government websites at the end of presidential administrations. The initial partners in EOT included CDL, the Internet Archive, the Library of Congress, the University of North Texas, and the U.S. Government Publishing Office. Volunteers at many Data Rescue events use the URL nomination and BagIt/Bagger tools developed as part of the EOT project.

Data Refuge – A collaborative effort that aims to backup research-quality copies of federal climate and environmental data, advocate for environmental literacy, and build a consortium of research libraries to scale their tools and practices to make copies of other kinds of federal data. Find a Data Rescue event near you.

Azimuth Climate Data Backup Project – An urgent project to back up US government climate databases. Initially started by statistician Jan Galkowski and John Baez, a mathematician and science blogger at UC Riverside.

Climate Mirror – A distributed volunteer effort to mirror and back up U.S. Federal Climate Data. This project is currently being lead by Data Refuge.

The Environmental Data and Governance Initiative – An international network of academics and non-profits that addresses potential threats to federal environmental and energy policy, and to the scientific research infrastructure built to investigate, inform, and enforce. EDGI has built many of the tools used at Data Rescue events.

March for Science – A celebration of science and a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. The main march in Washington DC and satellite marches around the world are scheduled for April 22nd (Earth Day).

314 Action – A nonprofit that intends to leverage the goals and values of the greater science, technology, engineering, and mathematics community to aggressively advocate for science.

csv conf is back in 2017!

csv,conf,v3 is happening!csv

This time the community-run conference will be in Portland, Oregon, USA on 2nd and 3rd of May 2017. It will feature stories about data sharing and data analysis from science, journalism, government, and open source. We want to bring together data makers/doers/hackers from backgrounds like science, journalism, open go
vernment and the wider software industry to share knowledge and stories.

csv,conf is a non-profit community conference run by people who love data and sharing knowledge. This isn’t just a conference about spreadsheets. CSV Conference is a conference about data sharing and data tools. We are curating content about advancing the art of data collaboration, from putting your data on GitHub to producing meaningful insight by running large scale distributed processing on a cluster.

Submit a Talk!  Talk proposals for csv,conf close Feb 15, so don’t delay, submit today! The deadline is fast approaching and we want to hear from a diverse range of voices from the data community.

Talks are 20 minutes long and can be about any data-related concept that you think is interesting. There are no rules for our talks, we just want you to propose a topic you are passionate about and think a room full of data nerds will also find interesting. You can check out some of the past talks from csv,conf,v1 and csv,conf,v2 to get an idea of what has been pitched before.

If you are passionate about data and the many applications it has in society, then join us in Portland!

csv-pic

Speaker perks:

  • Free pass to the conference
  • Limited number of travel awards available for those unable to pay
  • Did we mention it’s in Portland in the Spring????

Submit a talk proposal today at csvconf.com.

Early bird tickets are now on sale here.

If you have colleagues or friends who you think would be a great addition to the conference, please forward this invitation along to them! csv,conf,v3 is committed to bringing a diverse group together to discuss data topics.

– UC3 and the entire csv,conf,v3 team

For questions, please email csv-conf-coord@googlegroups.com, DM @csvconference or join the csv,conf public slack channel.

This was cross-posted from the Open Knowledge International Blog: http://blog.okfn.org/2017/01/12/csvconf-is-back-in-2017-submit-talk-proposals-on-the-art-of-data-analysis-and-collaboration/

Software Carpentry / Data Carpentry Instructor Training for Librarians

We are pleased to announce that we are partnering with Software Carpentry (http://software-carpentry.org) and Data Carpentry (http://datacarpentry.org) to offer an open instructor training course on May 4-5, 2017 geared specifically for the Library Carpentry movement.

Open call for Instructor Training

This course will take place in Portland, OR, in conjunction with csv,conf,v3, a community conference for data makers everywhere. It’s open to anyone, but the two-day event will focus on preparing members of the library community as Software and Data Carpentry instructors. The sessions will be led by Library Carpentry community members, Belinda Weaver and Tim Dennis.

If you’d like to participate, please apply by filling in the form at https://amy.software-carpentry.org/forms/request_training/  Application closed

What is Library Carpentry?

lib_carpentryFor those that don’t know, Library Carpentry is a global community of library professionals that is customizing Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry modules for training the library community in software and data skills. You can follow us on twitter @LibCarpentry.

Library Carpentry is actively creating training modules for librarians and holding workshops around the world. It’s a relatively new movement that has already been a huge success. You can learn more by reading the recently published article: Library Carpentry: software skills training for library professionals.

Why should I get certified?

Library Carpentry is a movement tightly coupled with the Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry organizations. Since all are based on a train-the-trainer model, one of our challenges has been how to get more experience as instructors. This issue is handled within Software and Data Carpentry by requiring instructor certification.

Although certification is not a requirement to be involved in Library Carpentry, we know that doing so will help us refine workshops, teaching modules, and grow the movement. Also, by getting certified, you can start hosting your own Library Carpentry, Software Carpentry, or Data Carpentry events on your campus. It’s a great way to engage with your campuses and library community!

Prerequisites

Applicants will learn how to teach people the skills and perspectives required to work more effectively with data and software. The focus will be on evidence-based education techniques and hands-on practice; as a condition of taking part, applicants must agree to:

  1. Abide by our code of conduct, which can be found at http://software-carpentry.org/conduct/ and http://datacarpentry.org/code-of-conduct/,
  1. Agree to teach at a Library Carpentry, Software Carpentry, or Data Carpentry workshop within 12 months of the course, and
  1. Complete three short tasks after the course in order to complete the certification. The tasks take a total of approximately 8-10 hours: see http://swcarpentry.github.io/instructor-training/checkout/ for details.

Costs

This course will be held in Portland, OR, in conjunction with csv,conf,v3 and is sponsored by csv,conf,v3 and the California Digital Library. To help offset the costs of this event, we will ask attendees to contribute an optional fee (tiered prices will be recommended based on your or your employer’s ability to pay). No one will be turned down based on inability to pay and a small number of travel awards will be made available (more information coming soon).

Application

Hope to see you there! To apply for this Software Carpentry / Data Carpentry Instructor Training course, please submit the application by Jan 31, 2017:

https://amy.software-carpentry.org/forms/request_training/  Application closed

Under Group Name, use “CSV (joint)” if you wish to attend both the training and the conference, or “CSV (training only)” if you only wish to attend the training course.

More information

If you have any questions about this Instructor Training course, please contact admin@software-carpentry.org. And if you have any questions about the Library Carpentry movement, please contact via email at uc3@ucop.edu, via twitter @LibCarpentry or join the Gitter chatroom.